Harvard:
Krishnamurti Bh., Moses Lincoln and Danforth Douglas G. 1983, "Unchanged Cognates as a Criterion in Linguistic Subgrouping", in Language, vol. 59, no. 3, pp. 541--568. Linguistic Society of America.
APA:
Krishnamurti Bh., Moses Lincoln and Danforth Douglas G. (1983). Unchanged Cognates as a Criterion in Linguistic Subgrouping. Language, 59 (3) , 541--568. Linguistic Society of America.
Chicago:
Krishnamurti Bh., Moses Lincoln and Danforth Douglas G. 1983. "Unchanged Cognates As a Criterion in Linguistic Subgrouping." In Language, 59 , no. 3: 541--568. Linguistic Society of America.
MLA:
Krishnamurti Bh., Moses Lincoln and Danforth Douglas G. "Unchanged Cognates As a Criterion in Linguistic Subgrouping." Language. 59.3 (1983): 541--568.
Citation within the text:
(Krishnamurti, Moses & Danforth 1983)
Zotero:
Save reference in Zotero
BibTeX:
@article{krishnamurti1983unchanged,
  source = {jstor},
  ISSN = {0097-8507},
  abstract = {If a sound change has lexically diffused without completing its course, one finds that among the lexical items qualified for the change, some have already changed (c), others have remained unchanged (u), and still others show variant forms (u/c). When such a change has affected a group of genetically related languages, the consequent comparative pattern u-u/c-c can be used to set up subrelations among languages. In this paper, we draw on data from six languages belonging to the South-Central subfamily of Dravidian, with reference to an atypical sound change called 'apical displacement'. There are 63 etymologies which qualify for the study. A total of 945 possible binary-labeled trees fall into six types for the six languages under study. In terms of our postulates, that tree is the best which scores the lowest m, i.e. the minimum number of independent instances of change needed to account for the u-c-o (o = no cognate) pattern of a given entry. Each of the 63 entries has been applied to the possible 945 trees, and the trees have been scored for the value m by computer. The one tree which scored the lowest (71 points) is identical with the traditionally established tree for these languages. This paper shows that: (a) one shared innovation is sufficient to give genetic subrelations among languages, within the framework of the theory of lexical diffusion; (b) unchanged cognates are as important as changed cognates in giving differential scores for possible trees; and (c) the notion of shared innovation can be further refined within the theory of lexical diffusion.},
  author = {{Krishnamurti, Bh.} and {Moses, Lincoln} and {Danforth, Douglas G.}},
  copyright = {Copyright 1983 Linguistic Society of America},
  journal = {Language},
  jstor_articletype = {Full Length Article},
  jstor_date = {198309},
  jstor_formatteddate = {Sep., 1983},
  month = {sep},
  number = {3},
  pages = {541--568},
  publisher = {Linguistic Society of America},
  title = {Unchanged Cognates as a Criterion in Linguistic Subgrouping},
  url = {http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0097-8507%28198309%2959%3A3%3C541%3AUCAACI%3E2.0.CO%3B2-7},
  volume = {59},
  year = {1983},
}