Harvard:
Kumar Ann and Rose Phil. 2000, "Lexical Evidence for Early Contact between Indonesian Languages and Japanese", in Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 39, no. 2, pp. 219--255. University of Hawai'i Press.
APA:
Kumar Ann and Rose Phil. (2000). Lexical Evidence for Early Contact between Indonesian Languages and Japanese. Oceanic Linguistics, 39 (2) , 219--255. University of Hawai'i Press.
Chicago:
Kumar Ann and Rose Phil. 2000. "Lexical Evidence For Early Contact Between Indonesian Languages and Japanese." In Oceanic Linguistics, 39 , no. 2: 219--255. University of Hawai'i Press.
MLA:
Kumar Ann and Rose Phil. "Lexical Evidence For Early Contact Between Indonesian Languages and Japanese." Oceanic Linguistics. 39.2 (2000): 219--255.
Citation within the text:
(Kumar & Rose 2000)
Zotero:
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BibTeX:
@article{kumar2000lexical,
  source = {jstor},
  ISSN = {0029-8115},
  abstract = {Forty-one pairs of words with CVCVC structure selected from Old Japanese and Old Javanese dictionaries are presented. It is claimed that these are the result of borrowing into an antecedent of Old Japanese from an Indonesian source. Semantic relationships are discussed, and sound correspondences are specified within a discussion of the segmental phonology and phonotactics of the two languages. The agreement in phonological form is shown to be extensive, applying in some cases to up to five segments in each word pair, and to also make sense, given the phonotactic restrictions of the recipient language. The semantic agreement is often also of comparably high specificity, showing moreover a further level of structure in its partial resolution into semantic fields, including some that resonate with nonlinguistic findings related to ritual and rice cultivation in the Yayoi period of early Japanese history. The amount of agreement in semantic and phonological form is shown statistically to be greater than chance. The argument is further strengthened by several additional independent levels of agreement in the data that are discussed within a Bayesian framework. The phonological correspondences map unidirectionally from Old Javanese to Old Japanese, and a search for cognates in all Austronesian languages covered by the major comparative dictionaries reveals that the lexical items are localized to the Indonesian subarea of Malayo-Polynesian. This points to one or more Indonesian languages as the source of the borrowings. The agreement between semantic and archaeological evidence on material and spiritual culture dates the contact to the Yayoi period. The semantic evidence further suggests that, contrary to the received view, important Yayoi innovations are likely to have been introduced into Japan from the south, and not from China or Korea as usually supposed.},
  author = {{Kumar, Ann} and {Rose, Phil}},
  copyright = {Copyright 2000 University of Hawai'i Press},
  journal = {Oceanic Linguistics},
  jstor_articletype = {Full Length Article},
  jstor_date = {200012},
  jstor_formatteddate = {Dec., 2000},
  month = {dec},
  number = {2},
  pages = {219--255},
  publisher = {University of Hawai'i Press},
  title = {Lexical Evidence for Early Contact between Indonesian Languages and Japanese},
  url = {http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0029-8115%28200012%2939%3A2%3C219%3ALEFECB%3E2.0.CO%3B2-I},
  volume = {39},
  year = {2000},
}