Harvard:
Matisoff, J.A. 1970, "Glottal Dissimilation and the Lahu High-Rising Tone: A Tonogenetic Case-Study", in Journal of the American Oriental Society, vol. 90, no. 1, pp. 13--44. American Oriental Society.
APA:
Matisoff, J.A. (1970). Glottal Dissimilation and the Lahu High-Rising Tone: A Tonogenetic Case-Study. Journal of the American Oriental Society, 90 (1) , 13--44. American Oriental Society.
Chicago:
Matisoff, James A. 1970. "Glottal Dissimilation and the Lahu High-Rising Tone: A Tonogenetic Case-Study." In Journal of the American Oriental Society, 90 , no. 1: 13--44. American Oriental Society.
MLA:
Matisoff, James A. "Glottal Dissimilation and the Lahu High-Rising Tone: A Tonogenetic Case-Study." Journal of the American Oriental Society. 90.1 (1970): 13--44.
Citation within the text:
(Matisoff 1970)
Zotero:
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BibTeX:
@article{matisoff1970glottal,
  source = {jstor},
  ISSN = {0003-0279},
  abstract = {The Lahu high-rising tone does not show any simple correspondences to tones in the other Lolo-Burmese languages. It can be demonstrated that it is a secondary development within Lahu, furnishing a striking confirmation of the assumption that tones arise in general through the influence of consonants in syllable-final or syllable-initial position. The high-rising tone arose in Lahu through dissimilation in pre-Lahu syllables which both began and ended with a "glottal incident." The G-2 ("second glottal incident") was provided by -$^{?}$ (from PLB $^{\ast}$-p, $^{\ast}$-t, or $^{\ast}$-k), while the G-1 was either a glottalized obstruent, a voiceless spirant (h, s, f), or zero (from PLB $^{\ast?}$-). Especially persuasive evidence is forthcoming from simplex-causative verb-pairs that ended in stops, since the causative morpheme can be shown to have been $^{\ast?}$- by PLB times. But over 100 non-causative cognate sets are presented as well. The discussion has bearing on the interpretation of the mysterious Tibetan consonant "a-chung" (h-), and raises several very general articulatory questions concerning the interrelationship of voicing, aspiration, glottalization, and tone.},
  author = {Matisoff, James A.},
  copyright = {Copyright 1970 American Oriental Society},
  journal = {Journal of the American Oriental Society},
  jstor_articletype = {Full Length Article},
  jstor_date = {197001/197003},
  jstor_formatteddate = {Jan. - Mar., 1970},
  month = {jan},
  number = {1},
  pages = {13--44},
  publisher = {American Oriental Society},
  title = {Glottal Dissimilation and the Lahu High-Rising Tone: A Tonogenetic Case-Study},
  url = {http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0003-0279%28197001%2F03%2990%3A1%3C13%3AGDATLH%3E2.0.CO%3B2-0},
  volume = {90},
  year = {1970},
}